Hold your nerve

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I have the most wonderful recipe for a cranberry tart. Years ago I demonstrated it at a Preparing for Advent event in Belfast. I had one little electric ring and a room full of expectant women- expectant in the waiting and not the Mary sense of the word, you understand.

The point about this tart is that at one critical stage, you have to hold your nerve. Your every instinct screams that the mixture will burn, is burning, has... but no, all shall be well and all manner of cranberries shall be well. However you must hold your nerve- when I post the recipe later this month, remember that you have been warned!

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I have been thinking about that tart and its mantra a great deal over these Autumn months. It has very much been a time of needing to have faith, or, to quote my husband, believe in the process. At work, the new kitchen has been taking shape. It is a huge investment for the company, and they are justifiably very excited about the opportunities that it will bring. I am extremely excited, but there is nonetheless a responsibility to get things right.

Not just in the sense of getting the kitchen itself right in the medium to long-term, but also to get the interim catering right in the short term, in the now! We have concentrated on soups and wraps. Thankfully both welcome at this time of the year. You can see from the beetroot and couscous that we have focused on fresh, filling ingredients, that can be easily carried back to a desk while we wait for the kitchen and its eating area to reach completion.

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We're trying to make it look and taste as faredos as possible- home-made, locally sourced and to the highest standard we can make it. We had a great boost to our confidence with our first corporate event: a retirement lunch. We were wholly restrained to finger food, but wanted to make it special. We had Scottish salmon on blinis with cream cheese and parsley, and mini Yorkshire puddings with roast beef and red onion relish, all followed by fruit kebabs and a sumptuous local cheese board.

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Of course, like the tart and the kitchen, all was well, all was well, and all manner of thing that day was well. And all that manner of thing reminds me to hold my nerve. I like the idea of holding resolute to the plan, but I must say that I like the more active idea of believing in the plan slightly more. It seems to me that maintaining faith in your process, whatever it may be, requires more than just a standing still. There certainly hasn't been a great deal of standing still this Autumn! As busy things continue all around us, may there be lots of quiet steps where we can pause a while in the late sunshine to hold and to believe!

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Posted on November 25, 2017 .

A sourdough experience

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Faredos is about food. It's about friends and community too, but first and foremost it is all about the food. Honest, innovative, as ethically sourced as I can make it, food. Which is why I loved living up the street from Bakery 47- I blogged about it a few posts ago. A Glasgow gem of honest, innovative, ethical, community minded bread. Which is why I was over the harvest moon to get a place on their two day sour-dough course, not least because the bakery itself has now closed its doors. 

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Over the two days we made sour dough country loaves, porridge bread, bagels, and rye bread with toasted nuts and seeds, from sour dough rye. It was a fine collection of makes with a fine collection of folk, wonderfully led by Bakery 47's own inspirational Sam, who led us through both days in the bakery's kitchen. The shop has been dismantled now that Sam and his wife, Anna, feel that they have accomplished the community experiment that was their main idea.

So, we mixed, and we kneaded, and we put everything lovingly to bed for the first night- all the breads were to prove slowly, heightening the quality. Our immediate reward was the lunch!  We ate and ate and ate Sam's own bread with scrambled eggs and tomatoes, and wonderfully aromatic dukkah: that great mix of hazelnuts and all other things ground into perfection for soups and sprinkling. And then we ate some more- Anna's carrot cake. I'm going to miss living up the street from Bakery 47!

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Our second day let us unleash even more bready creativity. We persuaded all our breads out of bed, which was the fridge, by the way. Then to the baking, but with the loaves, to distinguish them one from the other's, we made our own templates through which we sprinkled flour so that the baked bread would show our very own designs. From a reindeer to my own Lucy, our bread had our life thereon!

It was a most tremendous course. Obviously we all came away full of knowledge, and brimming with enthusiasm to get started on our starters, but we came away too with a deeper sense of community. The community of ourselves, now sharing ideas and experiments through a whatsapp group, but the community also of those who make and break bread together, with a eye for what that means for us. Here's my own first solo attempt since the course, and I'm passing a starter on to one of my sons to see what he'll come up with. More will be making its way into work menus, and event catering too. Bread for my community- I love that first picture at the top of this post. Food as fellowship. Fundamental!

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Posted on October 7, 2017 .

Scents of summer, and some poetry too...

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I know that we are well immersed now in the season of mists and mellow fruitfulness and believe me, I am right behind Yeats and his fruit with ripeness to the core. Absolutely let's swell the gourd and plump the hazel shells- but first, indulge me! Let's inhale the sweet outdoor aroma of summer food once more!

This summer was wholly about outside food for me. We spent lots of time in Hampshire, with a wonderful reunion of family on two levels. First, most of us ensconced ourselves in a wonderful yurt for a spot of glamping, but secondly this allowed us to be near my sister's family while they celebrated their fortieth wedding anniversary.

Our food at the yurt was all about simple ingredients, cooked simply, and simply scoffed- alfresco! Before the ubiquitous marshmallows over the fire pit on the night you see above we had enjoyed mushroom risotto with fresh salad leaves and roasted tomatoes. For breakfast my fine Liverpool son regaled us with avocado toast. We know how to camp in style! Admittedly the bar had been set high by the standard of our "tent"- you have to make an effort when you stay warm under heavy rain with your pot-bellied stove and rich décor!

Food at the party demanded finer still. We had roast ham and sides of salmon, served with spanopika, breads, and salads, with my ice bowls to finish. These ice bowls are one of my favourite summer displays. Bright, fresh summer flowers captured in the ice, and bright, fresh homemade ice-cream staying cold enough to be enjoyed if there's room enough for a little something at meal's end.

But yes, you're right; the Ode to Autumn calls- Where are the songs of Spring? (Or indeed Summer?) Ay, where are they? Fair enough- faredos! We're in full autumnal throw back in the kitchen. I'm on a sourdough course this week, so come back at the weekend for delicious scents of that x

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Posted on September 20, 2017 .

Finding My Feet

Welcome to Glasgow! We made it- and sometimes the sun even shines, just like in Ireland! It has been a busy time, finding our feet, exploring our new surroundings, seeing a new kitchen come together in work and at home, and delighting in the treats on our new doorstep.

One very favourite spot is Bakery 47. I love this place already. It is a tangibly passionate, bustling, jewel box of breads and cakes, with tea and coffee, and everything you could want on a Saturday morning or any other time really!

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Then, even closer to home, is Marchtown. It describes itself as a specialist wine and beer shop, but it is so much more. Just order one of their sharing platters. They'll bring you cold and fruity white wine, happily accommodate your dog as welland let you wallow in the homely atmosphere, chatting to folk at neighbouring tables, and enthusing over their relishes, olives andcheese. 

Speaking of Lucy, she has loved the huge expanses of Glasgow's parks. This is a city that knows how to incorporate greenery into every space from  windowbox and tenement step to square miles of meadow and wood. So many people have talked to me of finding my feet and landing on my feet, and that has been true in so many senses- not least the ironic! Another local discovery has been our nearest A & E. I didn't land on my feet quite so well a few weekends ago! But let me pay tribute to the staff there, as to everyone else who has made us so welcome: you are making this next step of ours wonderful!

Next time, I'll hopefully have news of some speciality sour-dough breads, and pictures of a pop up. Also hopefully no news of further injury! 

Posted on June 30, 2017 .

Moving: from Finn MacCool to Benandonner

My friend Mags has a son who grew up enchanted by tales of the Giant's Causeway. He loved the stories of Finn MacCool tricking the Scottish giant, Benandonner, sending him running back across the causeway to Scotland, casting its stones aside as he went. What Matthew really wanted to know though was where the other side was. "The other side of what?" Mags asked. "The other side of the Causeway. Where did it meet Scotland?" It was my mother who solved the riddle. "I've been there, Matthew," she said, leaning in to entrust valuable information to the seven year old. "It's on the island of Staffa. You can see the Scottish stones there. You'll need a boat."

For a long time now I have been thinking about Benandonner. For a long time now I have been feeling like Benandonner. I, you see, am about to run across to the other side myself. From our home at the Giant's Causeway to Fingal's Cave; well, to Glasgow at least!

I have had my feet on both sides of the Irish Sea for two years. Fred moved across to work with the Church of Scotland in May 2015, and only now have I been able to reconcile work and family demands to join him.

Of course my feet will still continue to cross the sea, but they'll mostly toast in front of the fire in Glasgow from now on.

From Irish beaches to Scottish shores; from Irish whiskey in my coffee, it will most likely be Scottish soon; walking with Lucy will be less along the Giant's Causeway and more over the hills of Loch Lomond.

Scottish work will, however, still be in catering. I need to concentrate first on establishing my employer's new Glasgow kitchen, but always with an eye to finding opportunities to share faredos' vision of fairly traded food with a wider, newer circle of friends. In fact, now that I come to think about how to explain faredos and its ethos to new folk, I realise that we are about even more than fair trade. It's that idea of using your LOAF: L for local produce, O for organic, A for animal-friendly, and F for fairly traded.

I am very excited! It has been a long enough old crossing, but soon Benandonner will be on the other side. New home, new job, new possibilities- and hopefully a new blog post too. Thank you for all your interest in and support of faredos thus far. A new tale is coming shortly!

Posted on May 18, 2017 .

Farewell at Fortwilliam

Recently we catered a farewell lunch at a Presbyterian church, not in Scotland (though look out for a post next weekend about that), but in the Fortwilliam area of North Belfast. It celebrated the wonderful ministry of Rev. Lesley Carroll.

Recently we catered a farewell lunch at a Presbyterian church, not in Scotland (though look out for a post next weekend about that), but in the Fortwilliam area of North Belfast. It celebrated the wonderful ministry of Rev. Lesley Carroll.

No-one knows the full depth and breadth of Lesley's ministry. She has been there for the last fifteen years or so, doing an amazing job in the church, and also in the building up of cross-community links in that corner of the city. Her vision embraced the broader political and the international communities on the church's doorstep.

No-one knows the full depth and breadth of Lesley's ministry. She has been there for the last fifteen years or so, doing an amazing job in the church, and also in the building up of cross-community links in that corner of the city. Her vision embraced the broader political and the international communities on the church's doorstep.

Lesley's work was one of welcome to all, whether long-standing residents or refugees, promoting peace and reconciliation on that doorstep. Her efforts were huge.

Lesley's work was one of welcome to all, whether long-standing residents or refugees, promoting peace and reconciliation on that doorstep. Her efforts were huge.

As we set up, served, and cleared away I found myself thinking about that relationship between the work that is seen and celebrated, and the work that is unseen and yet essential. Like the work of Lesley Carroll, catering is not all about the finished result, the array of successful outcomes. It too is about the hard work that goes on in the background.

As we set up, served, and cleared away I found myself thinking about that relationship between the work that is seen and celebrated, and the work that is unseen and yet essential. Like the work of Lesley Carroll, catering is not all about the finished result, the array of successful outcomes. It too is about the hard work that goes on in the background.

The aim for us is to keep things looking seamless. Delicious and beautiful food, friendly and attentive service, promoting perhaps an idea that life is always like that, or can be at least for this short time!

The aim for us is to keep things looking seamless. Delicious and beautiful food, friendly and attentive service, promoting perhaps an idea that life is always like that, or can be at least for this short time!

We don't want our guests to see the chaos, see the dishes being done! So here is a brief glimpse of the duck's swimming legs beneath the smooth waters! Hard work and consistent efforts, in the firm belief that the end result will be worth it all. At faredos we wish you food, fellowship and peace. Behind the scenes, well, that's another story!

We don't want our guests to see the chaos, see the dishes being done! So here is a brief glimpse of the duck's swimming legs beneath the smooth waters! Hard work and consistent efforts, in the firm belief that the end result will be worth it all. At faredos we wish you food, fellowship and peace. Behind the scenes, well, that's another story!

Posted on May 14, 2017 .

Faredos Filosophy

Wouldn’t that be a great title for a post about our next filo creation? I’m afraid this post isn’t about filo though; in fact, this post isn’t really about food at all.

On Monday, the Bank Holiday, I helped to run a creative retreat at Corrymeela with an amazing silk artist from Glasgow, Pauline Edmiston.  If you’re on facebook, you can find her as Silk and Such, or you can read Heather’s moving account of her day here:

http://hookeryinthebookery.blogspot.co.uk/2016/08/sun-seaside-and-silks.html

I did take food. With our morning coffee as folk arrived I had scones with homemade blackberry jam. But they weren’t all eaten: the sun was shining, people were relaxing into a day free from caring for the world and his wife, chat flowed as freely as path to the Croi. Most of the scones were devoured later by the staff and new volunteers.

At the end of the day, a day of stretching silk, reflecting through silk, placing silk, creating with silk, I had a gorgeous great big slab of lemon cake. As part of the parallel programme for children of participants I’d given the cake to the kids to decorate. Obviously GBBO generation to come! Blueberries and raspberries in a most sophisticated array! But it wasn’t all eaten: the sun was still shining, people were sharing their thoughts of the day, taking their last stunning photos of the stunning Corrymeela landscape.

You see, the thing about faredos is that it really isn’t all about the food. Food brings people together; food brings a smile to their faces and fills them with good things; food unites, reunites, nourishes, kindles, comforts, sustains. But in the photos, while you can see the food (well, the cake), it’s in the background. What you’ll see most on the day? The people. That’s what Faredos’ filosophy philosophyis all about: the celebration, the discussion, the moment.

Posted on September 4, 2016 .

Sweet Serendipity

Sometimes I realise that my exciting new discovery is in fact very old hat to everyone else! I was so excited with the roasted sweetcorn dip recipe that came my way from a friend in Waterford. We met on the PTA for our children's school there, and now with children grown we remain friends. The dip came her way from The Pioneer Woman- well, I thought this was ground-breaking culinary news! Yes, I know now that you've been reading her for years. If you'd like to try her sweetcorn too...

Sometimes I realise that my exciting new discovery is in fact very old hat to everyone else! I was so excited with the roasted sweetcorn dip recipe that came my way from a friend in Waterford. We met on the PTA for our children's school there, and now with children grown we remain friends. The dip came her way from The Pioneer Woman- well, I thought this was ground-breaking culinary news! Yes, I know now that you've been reading her for years. If you'd like to try her sweetcorn too...

My dip was served up at the wonderful Pamela's 80th birthday party. Pamela and Ian are both life-long and very active supporters of Christian Aid. They believe passionately in striving towards a fairer world, and while not vegetarians, asked for a heavy emphasis on vegetarian food at the party. These are the sweet potato and sweetcorn enchiladas with smokey sweet red pepper sauce and coriander chimchi.

My dip was served up at the wonderful Pamela's 80th birthday party. Pamela and Ian are both life-long and very active supporters of Christian Aid. They believe passionately in striving towards a fairer world, and while not vegetarians, asked for a heavy emphasis on vegetarian food at the party. These are the sweet potato and sweetcorn enchiladas with smokey sweet red pepper sauce and coriander chimchi.

And here are aubergine rolls stuffed with pine nuts, breadcrumbs and raisins. These are absolutely delicious on their own, but can also be served warm with tomato sauce, or as a vegetable side dish. We served quinoa salad with pomegranate too- if you need a vegetarian feast, do get straight in touch!

And here are aubergine rolls stuffed with pine nuts, breadcrumbs and raisins. These are absolutely delicious on their own, but can also be served warm with tomato sauce, or as a vegetable side dish. We served quinoa salad with pomegranate too- if you need a vegetarian feast, do get straight in touch!

Desserts- meringues with more of my garden raspberries (Pamela and Ian approved the zero food miles), and Faredos' ubiquitous Moroccan Orange Cake. I haven't shown you photos yet of our Moroccan adventure last month. Coming soon!

Desserts- meringues with more of my garden raspberries (Pamela and Ian approved the zero food miles), and Faredos' ubiquitous Moroccan Orange Cake. I haven't shown you photos yet of our Moroccan adventure last month. Coming soon!

It was, as you can tell from the many sweet ingredients, a very sweet party. Happy Birthday, Pamela, and Happy Faredos!

It was, as you can tell from the many sweet ingredients, a very sweet party. Happy Birthday, Pamela, and Happy Faredos!

In other news, and in another corner of the Faredos kitchen garden, we have a gorgeous glut of courgettes and their beautiful flowers. I said a sad farewell this week to the two Italian interns who have been living with us over the summer, but not before Carlotta got a chance to display her food designer prowess!

In other news, and in another corner of the Faredos kitchen garden, we have a gorgeous glut of courgettes and their beautiful flowers. I said a sad farewell this week to the two Italian interns who have been living with us over the summer, but not before Carlotta got a chance to display her food designer prowess!

I've always wanted to try stuffed courgette flowers, but never quite managed to have the courgette flowers and the ricotta cheese in the same place at the same time. Well, not only did I have the flowers and the cheese last week, I had the stylish Italians too.

I've always wanted to try stuffed courgette flowers, but never quite managed to have the courgette flowers and the ricotta cheese in the same place at the same time. Well, not only did I have the flowers and the cheese last week, I had the stylish Italians too.

Sweet serendipity! These were very deliciously wonderful indeed. I have to confess that we kept them all for ourselves, and a lovely dish it was. But, if you do fancy a sweet feast, especially for a vegetarian, get in touch while the garden is still in bloom x

Sweet serendipity! These were very deliciously wonderful indeed. I have to confess that we kept them all for ourselves, and a lovely dish it was. But, if you do fancy a sweet feast, especially for a vegetarian, get in touch while the garden is still in bloom x

Posted on August 15, 2016 .

Home Grown

Our friend Alan planted raspberry canes back in the Spring, with no immediate expectation of any fruit. This was his first little harvest last week. Sometimes surprises are all good.

I am often called upon for event catering by a local Anglican church, and recently had the privilege of serving the family and friends of a wonderful man who had passed. Sometimes surprises bring pain.

Support for the family was actually huge, with many more coming to pay their respects and offer support and condolence than we had anticipated. Another surprise! This is one of the aspects of our work that keeps us beautifully on our toes. Keeping the tea and coffee and nice things flowing smoothly is an important aspect of such a day for everyone. If we are able to ensure comfort and refreshment at an emotional time, we have done an important thing for special people.

Thankfully, and enormous thanks to my team that day, we were well prepared, and had enough for everyone. I was especially pleased with our raspberry meringues. A little mouthful of sweetness in the bittersweet remembrance of things past. In fact, my raspberries were home grown too. At Faredos we strive to provide excellent, seasonal food from local or fairly traded sources, and it doesn’t come much more local or fair than my side garden!  Admittedly the birds may not agree with the fair bit- hope they weren’t too surprised…

Posted on July 29, 2016 .

Good to know

It's good to know how you're really doing. It's good to hear from folk who can send you feedback after an event that will keep you smiling and keep you cooking. There's been a run of birthdays recently: 50ths, 60ths, 70ths, and 90ths! They were happy birthdays indeed, with happy families all gathered together. And kindly, lots of comments came flooding in afterwards.

These comments came from one of the 60th parties; the first from the sister of the birthday girl:

We had a lovely, special family time and plenty of craic! Think the birthday girl enjoyed herself! Your delicious banquet was thoroughly enjoyed by everyone and much appreciated by us. Drooling now just thinking about it, especially that cheesecake!!! MANY THANKS.

And nicely this from the same birthday girl herself:

Thank you, C, for your good wishes, lovely present and not least your wonderful food. It was just great, enjoyed by 27 oldies and 8 little ones!! I had a lovely birthday!

That Cheesecake I have been making for fifteen years! It is a baked raspberry cheesecake, a great recipe that hits the spot every time. I'm planning on making it over the holidays and will post the recipe, with pictures this time, here on the blog. It will wait until after my trip to Glasgow this weekend, where I'll be celebrating Easter with Fred and enjoying the delights of a Scottish Spring.

Cheesecake will be going to one of my facebook followers, now that I've reached 100 likes - random draw to take place 31st March.

Happy Easter to you all x

Posted on March 23, 2016 .

More tea, Vicar?

This month has been a time for the Church of Ireland, with a diocesan lunch in Jordanstown, and a training day for clergy and their Continuing Ministerial Education group, this last event held in the beautiful St Anne's cathedral, Belfast. Here the season demanded hearty pumpkin soup with its spicy warmth, balanced by the cool but tasty sweet potato and beetroot salad, shown above. I served these with my special wheatenand focaccia breads, proving below with its autumn blanket of olive oil, garlic and thyme. It's a shame the blog doesn't relay aroma!

This month has been a time for the Church of Ireland, with a diocesan lunch in Jordanstown, and a training day for clergy and their Continuing Ministerial Education group, this last event held in the beautiful St Anne's cathedral, Belfast. Here the season demanded hearty pumpkin soup with its spicy warmth, balanced by the cool but tasty sweet potato and beetroot salad, shown above. I served these with my special wheatenand focaccia breads, proving below with its autumn blanket of olive oil, garlic and thyme. It's a shame the blog doesn't relay aroma!

Sweet things came in the form of miniature fig, almond and rosewater cakes. There were also chocolate chip and caramel squares, but again you can't always get photographs of food that moves fast! We refrained from actually asking, "More tea, Vicar?" but we were thinking it with a smile!

Sweet things came in the form of miniature fig, almond and rosewater cakes. There were also chocolate chip and caramel squares, but again you can't always get photographs of food that moves fast! We refrained from actually asking, "More tea, Vicar?" but we were thinking it with a smile!

In Jordanstown a little while after, we served a variety of sandwiches with Mizuna soup, which is I think of South African origin. It is bursting with interesting combinations of flavours: sweet potato, chick pea and spices all finished with a kick of soy sauce, lime and coriander. It melts together into an unexpected and deeply satisfying bowl. The recipe for this was given to me by the fabulous Becky Dudley who has unfortunately moved to New Zealand. She has long been so generous with her talents and time and is still sorely missed. Obviously the clergy of Jordanstown didn't know all that about the soup, but Becky was certainly much in my smile as I endeavoured not to ask, "More tea, Vicar?"

Posted on November 15, 2015 .

Keeping it in the family

Unfortunately this month I have no photos at all. That’s probably the best recommendation for our food that I could have! It all went so quickly that there was just no time to capture the moment.

We had a lovely time catering a baptism. It was the latest family event in what has become a long-standing relationship with the R Family. It started with a retirement celebration, continued with an anniversary party, and carried on to a wedding. The bride and groom became Mum and Dad and invited us to share their day once more. Both the wedding and the baptism reflected their cosmopolitan roots in Ireland and Iran, making both days so very interesting.

Interesting days call for interesting food. Guests were welcomed with elderflower champagne and canapés in the garden. The weather was glorious too! Bruschetta with roasted red peppers and olives, and aubergine and mushroom; and hummous with delicious sour dough breads. This all went quickly, thankfully, as the wasps were gathering with us under the plum trees!

Seeking the safety of the marquee and dining room we served salmon with sweet chilli sauce and crème fraiche, with gorgeous char-grilled aubergines, and pomegranates and feta served with bagna càuda- a rich Italian sauce. I have to say that this is an unctuous thing of beauty. Everyone was delighted with it and there most certainly would not have been a chance to capture any on camera! We also served Thai Beef, along with a selection of salads including our new Persian salad. This is dressed with orange blossom and is wonderfully light and fragrant.

Ingrid and I were helped on the day by John and Kelsey who served desserts as guests mingled. We served Lemon Polenta Cake with summer berries, meringues, my own vanilla and blackcurrant ice-creams, and then rhubarb and strawberry compote which was made from fruit from my garden, keeping our food miles low!

It is always deeply gratifying to forge a relationship with a family, and to be invited back again and again to share their joy. For me food brings people together. When you’ve had a meal of joy, wherever that may have been, you will continue to be nurtured by it, and by the time you had around that table, for many days to come. We’d love to share some joy with you x

Posted on September 27, 2015 .

Happy 30th, Nicole!

A birthday is always lovely, but a birthday with cake and buns and flowers and beautiful crockery is by far my best definition of the event!

Recently the world-travelling Nicole was home on Irish shores with her antipodean husband. Celebrating three decades of adventurous spirit and a family of great love. It was all beauty and heart.

Quite a tall order reflecting all this in mere food, but everyone seemed happy! There were serendipitous delights of chocolate and caramel, cut into bites and topped with some fruity surprises.

Shots of passion fruit mousse crowned with luscious raspberries.

Joined on the cake stands by chocolate cups and squares of the Cake from Morocco (see previous post).

There were savoury things as well, but they didn't last long enough to be photographed. What can I say? Obviously happy birthday people.

And so to The Cake. I do love cake. It is a ubiquitous part of so many aspects of our family life. There should always be cake in a tin, be it for picnic, friends round, comfort, but especially for birthdays. This particular candidate was the wonderful Eunice Power's chocolate cake with raspberry mousse slice, finished with ganache. I'd be only too delighted to make one for you too! Raspberry mousse slice....

The birthday girl herself took this stunning picture. It was a magical afternoon. Fresh flowers as well as candles bedecking the cake- we'll be using that idea again!

Great to see you, Nicole. Happy Birthday x Looking forward to the next time!

Posted on June 22, 2015 .

Ministry in Focus, with food

Photo Exhibition by Fred Vincent

Friday 22nd - Sunday 24th May 2015

309 Cavehill Road, Belfast

 

This weekend Fred has his first photo-journalism exhibition, kindly hosted by 309.  The photographs document what started as a personal project to collate the experience of ministries across North Belfast, still in many ways a fractured part of the city.

Over the course of recorded interviews what began in curiosity grew as frank answers to incisive questions revealed a fascinating overview of how personal journeys translate into faith work in the community.

On show this weekend are the photographs with an edited version of the interviews. This will only give the audience a tantalising glimpse of the profoundly moving material which will soon be available on-line, where images and words can give the fuller picture.

For the exhibition faredos supplied some food for their thought: traditional Irish shortbread made to Ingrid's mother's recipe and handed down from greedy hand to hand, along with my much in demand Moroccan Orange cake. I'm always delighted that this has become evryone's go-to dessert, but I've said it before and I'll say it again. Do not have this at my wake- in my eternity, I'll finally be Moroccan Orange Cake free...

Hands
Posted on May 23, 2015 .

In the kitchen this week... 08/08/2014

Well, quite a busy week for Faredos – had my stroganoff described as ‘sublime’, by a very nice man with a lovely radio 4 voice – I could do with him to describe my food more often!

Busy week, all round, catering at McLaughlin and Harvey with desserts to prepare for a family party last weekend  – Baked Raspberry Cheesecake, Delicious Chocolate Brownies, following the best recipe ever – but I can’t remember who gave it to me, and the ever popular Moroccan Orange Cake. I feel I could make the orange cake blindfolded I have done it so often, but it really very tasty.

I was also catering for a funeral in Jordanstown on Wednesday, obviously a man with a life well lived as his friends and family demonstrated. Ingrid, Elaine and Maeve all looked after the funeral refreshments and I made a Beef Stroganoff for the family to share together later.

Looking forward to catering for birthdays and  anniversaries in the next 2 to 3 weeks – August and September are going to be a busy time for faredos.

More on that to follow...

In the meantime, SH presented me with cherry tomatoes, which taste sublime, scallions from his gardens and kohlrabi which I am going to find out how to use – any suggestions welcome

Posted on April 1, 2015 .